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Stroke Research

Stroke Clinical Research Program at SVMHS

Researchers are studying the mechanisms of stroke risk factors and the process of brain damage that results from stroke. Basic research has also focused on the genetics of stroke and stroke risk factors. Scientists are working to develop new and better ways to help the brain repair itself to restore important functions. New advances in imaging and rehabilitation have shown that the brain can compensate for function lost as a result of stroke.

Clinical trials are part of clinical research and at the heart of all medical advances. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. Scientists are conducting research to learn more about stroke, including the following study here at SVMHS:

  • In one-third of ischemic strokes, a specific cause cannot be identified. Many of these cryptogenic strokes appear to arise from a distant embolic source. Recent evidence suggests that some cryptogenic strokes arise from left atrial thromboembolism that goes unrecognized because it is not associated with atrial fibrillation/flutter (AF). ARCADIA is a multicenter, biomarker-driven, randomized, double-blind, active-control, phase 3 clinical trial of apixaban versus aspirin in patients who have evidence of atrial cardiopathy and a recent stroke of unknown cause. Objectives: Primary: To test the hypothesis that apixaban is superior to aspirin for the prevention of recurrent stroke in patients with cryptogenic ischemic stroke and atrial cardiopathy. Secondary: To test the hypothesis that the relative efficacy of apixaban over aspirin increases with the severity of atrial cardiopathy.

Videos/Brochures

Meet the Investigator

Next Steps

If you or a family member are thinking about being in a research study, feel free to download one of our brochures:

SVMHS is looking for individuals to participate in clinical studies. Participating in clinical trials allows you to play an active role in studies on the nature and causes of many disorders, and to possibly help physician-scientists develop future treatments.

For questions and more information about our clinical trials and research, please email us at research@svmh.com.